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Our graduates talk about their career experiences and prospects

Graduates and students

ArcelorMittal offers a wide range of opportunities for graduates all over the world Graduates.

Graduates

At ArcelorMittal we look for talented young people to become part of our team. With positions around the world and in different areas of the business, we provide a wide range of opportunities for university graduates looking to work in a challenging environment.

Students

To make sure we attract the best people, we partner with universities and schools through sponsorship, job fairs, scholarships and educational activities. In some countries we offer internships, apprenticeships and work experience to give both parties a chance to see if they wish to work together on a long-term basis.

We look for students who are motivated, enthusiastic and want to experience the real world of work. Working at ArcelorMittal provides students with a place to develop and apply professional skills and competencies.

Volunteer for international experience (VIE)

We offer young graduates the chance to work overseas through our volunteer for international experience (VIE) scheme. This programme lasts anywhere from six months to two years and is open to European graduates keen to develop their work experience through working abroad. We believe the VIE programme is a real opportunity to experience working life at ArcelorMittal in an international context, helping us to build the workforce of our future.

 

Meet our graduates

 

Andrey Popov

Engineer – bar mill

ArcelorMittal Temirtau, Kazakhstan

Q:
What brought about your interest in metallurgy?
A:

The fact that you sometimes need to think hard and go deep into a problem in order to achieve positive results.

Q:
How long have you been with ArcelorMittal?
A:

I've been with ArcelorMittal since early 2013.

Q:
What are your main responsibilities?
A:

My main responsibility is the tune-up of the mill for rolling rebar to the required quality.

Q:
What do you most enjoy about your job?
A:

I like my team and I enjoy it when a job goes well as a result of my work.

Q:
What kind of career support, such as mentoring or training, do you get?
A:

My colleagues share their experience with me all the time. As I am part of the top 100 engineers program, I have a mentor who controls and assesses my work and helps me with my project, something that each participant in the program has. We also have different types of training, one of which was training through the progress academy modules.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

Both of these aspects are pretty good, but in my opinion nothing is perfect and every system needs some development and there is room for perfection of the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal?
A:

Despite the fact that I don’t have much experience, I can see that there are many good opportunities at ArcelorMittal, because there are many different and interesting projects that are being implemented and there is a chance to be a part of these.

Ermek Kalimbetov

Engineer – coke & chemical plant

ArcelorMittal Temirtau, Kazakhstan

Q:
What brought about your interest in your field?
A:

In my opinion, metallurgy is very interesting and difficult industry. It was very interesting for me, to see how people learned how to make steel with a different chemical composition, and then make metal products from it. So, after school I already knew that I wanted to be a technical specialist. I passed the examination and chose the metallurgical profession.

Q:
How long have you been with ArcelorMittal?
A:

Since early 2013. But when I studied at the university I worked in different parts of our plant.

Q:
What are your main responsibilities?
A:

I work in the tar processing shop and my main responsibilities include making the distillation of tar fractions.

Q:
What do you most enjoy about your job?
A:

For me it is interesting how at different temperatures we can get different tar fractions. Also, we have good and friendly colleagues.

Q:
What kind of career support, such as mentoring or training, do you get?
A:

I have a mentor who works with me every day, gives me advices and new knowledge. Also we completed training with the progress group in the ArcelorMittal Progress Academy modules and as well as being trained by employees from the education and training center here in Kazakhstan.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

The work culture and ethics are important in the company. Each employee must follow rules, norms and standards of the company and one of the main aspects in this is following the health and safety rules, because people’s safety is the priority in our company.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal, which you think would be of interest to people who want to work with the company?
A:

ArcelorMittal offers good opportunities for further development and professional growth. For example, as a member of the top 100 engineers program I acquire valuable professional skills and experience in my workplace and through different training with the help of my mentor, colleagues and the human resources training, development and recruitment department.

Joseph Lysiak

Associate mechanical engineer

ArcelorMittal LaPlace, USA

Q:
How did you find out about this opportunity to go to university and gain a tertiary qualification in a subject you are passionate about?
A:

Before I started school, I was working in two jobs.  This became very tiring, so I decided that I needed to find time to take up the opportunity to start a career instead of just working.  Luckily, I had very helpful employers who created a schedule around my class hours, allowing me to achieve my degree.

Q:
Can you explain your interest in your field?
A:

Both my father and uncle were engineers, so I figured the only logical choice was to explore a career in engineering.  The job market in Louisiana was very welcoming to engineers as well.

Q:
How long have you been with ArcelorMittal?
A:

I have been with ArcelorMittal since May 30, 2012.

Q:
What are your main responsibilities?
A:

I primarily assist in the melt shop maintenance department.  This includes various projects that are assigned to me and that require contractors to complete the work.  I also assist with project planning for our employees, for the larger scale work that needs to be completed.

Q:
What do you most enjoy about your job?
A:

What I enjoy most about my job is the flexibility.  I am not doing the same thing over and over again.  I work on projects in all areas of the melt shop.  I work in the field on some days - not just stuck on a computer every day.  This really gives me the opportunity to learn what really goes on during a day at the mill.  I am learning something new every day and I would not be able to obtain that knowledge sitting at a desk all day long.  This really makes for some pretty exciting experiences, and it keeps me interested in my job.

Q:
What kind of career support, such as mentoring or training, do you get?
A:

ArcelorMittal does an outstanding job of providing training for new hires.  Not only have I received training outside my work area, but they also offered me training at the plant in LaPlace.  This continued during my employment and this is very important as learning should never stop.  This gives me the ability to learn things that were not taught at school and is vital to a successful career in the steel industry.  I do not have a mentor but I pull knowledge from a number of qualified managers that are there to support me anytime I need help.  They are always willing to point me in the right direction when I am confused about what needs to be done.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

The culture at work is to ensure the safety of everyone that enters the plant.  We want to make sure that everyone who enters the plant, leaves without incident.  ArcelorMittal LaPlace is a fairly new location for the company and the previous company before had safety lower on the priority list.  This left us with a lot of room for improvement, but we are closing the gap at a steady pace.  I have worked on multiple projects including fall protection, walkway safety, structural safety, etc, and I do not see this slowing down anytime soon.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal?
A:

The two aspects of working for ArcelorMittal that stand out the most to me are my colleagues’ patience and willingness to listen.  When I first started working for the company, I was entering as a college hire with very little experience.  I was worried that my productivity was not going to meet expectations as I tried to understand how things are run. 
I was pleasantly greeted by all levels of management that understood the learning curve I faced. Everyone, including the general manager, was very supportive as it took some time for me to understand my role and duties. 
They also are very interested in my career development.  I am always asked about what career path I would like to follow and ArcelorMittal is very considerate of my wishes.  I feel that I will not be forced to take a position that I do not want and that was very reassuring for me.  This gives me the option of doing what I believe best fits my talents and makes me feel very comfortable about my future with the company.

Thabile Ndlangamandla

Human Resources

ArcelorMittal South Africa

Q:
How did you find this opportunity to go to university and gain a qualification in a subject you are passionate about?
A:

I joined ArcelorMittal South Africa in 2010 at the ArcelorMittal science centre. Later that same year I joined the company’s corporate office as a temporary employee. I was responsible for pipeline recruitment; I did the selection and recruitment of apprentices and production learner. Pipeline resourcing is a section in the human resource department and through this, I gained interest in human resources (HR). My manager at that time, Cecilia Trollip, saw my interest in HR and I was given the opportunity to be part of the human resources graduate training programme. It was during one of my monthly one-on-one discussion sessions with Cecilia that I indicated my intentions to obtain a formal qualification in this discipline and she supported the idea.
I enrolled for a B.com Human Resources Management at the NorthWest University and I obtained an ArcelorMittal bursary to fund my studies. I am enjoying it and I have never looked back since!

Q:
What brought about your interest in your field?
A:

I’ve always enjoyed applying my mind, making a difference, making improvements and being analytical. I must admit that in high school, human resources was the last thing on my mind so I followed the biochemistry route. Human resources was labelled more as office paperwork, office bound. But those days are now gone. I would say my interest in the HR field was brought about firstly by my observations of other companies I’ve worked for. The HR departments weren’t as involved as I came to realise at ArcelorMittal. ArcelorMittal’s HR team is involved in the overall business strategy. We partner with other departments to achieve business goals.
Secondly, I was fascinated by the processes, structure, endless development opportunities, not just for me, but for all employees, and how I could apply my mind to making the process better.
Our processes are not rigid, we adapt to the market and our structure is designed to meet business needs. Finally, as an individual, I feel I’m making a change to the overall business strategy.

Q:
What are your main responsibilities?
A:

I’m currently part of the ArcelorMittal graduate programme, a 24-month programme wherein I’m exposed to different sub-departments within the HR discipline. The programme is structured in a way that we rotate to respective departments for a minimum period of two months. We are given an opportunity to lead projects and gain an understanding of the department. At the end of the program one has an exposure to and an overview of HR as a whole. ArcelorMittal South Africa subscribes to the philosophy of pipelining. I’m currently in the resourcing department where I’m responsible for pipeline recruitment, which involves the recruitment of apprentices, production learners and bursars. I’m also responsible for graduate programmes and career expos.
I’m responsible for identifying talent, recruitment and making candidates available for development through formal channels to achieve the required qualifications and skills.

Q:
What do you most enjoy about your job?
A:

I love what I do because every aspect of it is just part of who I am and my personality is well suited for the environment I’m in.To explain briefly what I do; I recruit, select and place new recruits on a monthly basis depending on the business demand or need. As you can imagine my work requires a lot of planning, entails communicating with internal and external clients. It’s a high pace environment which is just ideal because I have a lot of energy and there are always new challenges.

Q:
What kind of career support, such as mentoring or training, do you get?
A:

I have had a mentor for two years; Terrence Harrison. We meet on a monthly basis to discuss my progress, development programme and new career goals. I also have coaches in every HR sub-area I rotate in. We also have world class in-house training facility; the library, ArcelorMittal University which offers a variety of training programmes that ensures that I’m on a par with fellow colleagues throughout the ArcelorMittal group.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

ArcelorMittal South Africa has inherited challenges from the past but we are gradually evolving. I’m excited to work for an organisation that embraces talent, which exposes me and pushes me to do more. ArcelorMittal South Africa’s culture is inclusive, promotes personal development and encourages innovation.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal?
A:

ArcelorMittal has a global presence which leads to endless career opportunities. The leadership we have truly encourages me to explore all dimensions of who I really am and exposes me to different aspects of the business. This makes me feel confident that I am part of this organization and that I truly understand its dynamics. I have had opportunities to work with people outside South Africa, we exchange ideas and our processes are aligned to ensure that the experience is the same for all ArcelorMittal employees. I would say to people who want to join ArcelorMittal, if you are bold and aspire to discover your true potential and wish to be in a thought provoking environment: join us. ArcelorMittal has identified me as a talent, and who I am makes a difference at ArcelorMittal.

Jennifer St. Paul Butler

Environmental analyst

Baffinland Iron Mines, Canada

Q:
How did you find this opportunity to go to university and gain a tertiary qualification in a subject you are passionate about?
A:

I knew that I wanted to concentrate my studies in the environmental sector, which first led me to a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Geography and then a Master’s of Science (MSc) in Planning (Environmental). I began working at ArcelorMittal before I graduated. I decided to write my thesis on corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs in the mining industry, specifically on smaller junior exploration companies who often have little financing or manpower to participate in CSR programs in a meaningful way. The program, offered through the University of Toronto, was flexible enough to allow me to focus my work in conjunction with the knowledge and contacts I was building in the mining industry. I would highly recommend it. For me, a technical qualification such as a P.Eng or P.Geo, which one often finds in this industry, was not the best fit for my career goals and skills. Finishing the program I wanted, and then finding that not only was there a place for me in mining and steel, but there was demand for my knowledge and skills, was very gratifying.

Q:
What brought about your interest in your field?
A:

I grew up in the woods, on a farm, and from an early age was interested in the environment. During my undergraduate studies I was exposed to many of the opportunities related to the environment in the public sector, but it was not until I started with ArcelorMittal that I became aware of all of the amazing opportunities in the corporate world. Sustainable development positions and programs are not quite as prevalent in Canada as they are now in Europe and there is a real opportunity to start with companies at ground level and participate in meaningful change as we continue to push the boundaries of “best practice”. The other exciting part of CSR and sustainable development is that I get to work across departments with all the people in my organization. I love the cooperative spirit that is designed into these positions.

Q:
How long have you been with ArcelorMittal?
A:

I have been with the company since 2011, first as an environmental coordinator and now as an environmental analyst.

Q:
What are your main responsibilities?
A:

I work in support of the director of sustainable development for the Mary River project and as such am responsible for writing, editing, and other tasks related to environmental assessments, permits and licenses, and annual reporting. I have a hand in our environmental management programs, and work closely with our communications department in matters related to community consultation. I plan and attend meetings, develop content for our website and other materials, and facilitate departmental document control and English to Inuktitut translation of materials.

Q:
What do you most enjoy about your job?
A:

Always meeting new people, travelling to the Arctic, and the days are never the same or boring!

Q:
What kind of career support, such as mentoring or training, do you get?
A:

The Mary River project has an incredibly skilled and experienced group of employees. I have been extremely fortunate in that the team that I work with is the most supportive group. Outside my department, the company in general has a very open-door policy. I’ve found ArcelorMittal to be a close-knit group and seeking advice and/or guidance from counterparts across the Atlantic is not unheard of, and in fact, is encouraged.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

Working at ArcelorMittal is ideal for those who like a challenge. Mining and steel manufacturing are exciting, fast-paced, at the forefront of technological developments, and critical to global development. It is also a small world in the sense that everyone seems to know each other (even across borders) and there is a real feeling of camaraderie between employees – almost like a family, in my experience. This blending of cutting-edge technology, and impactful decision-making, but also, enjoying what we do and having the support of those around us defines the working culture at ArcelorMittal.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal?
A:

Working for an organization such as ArcelorMittal will mean that a lot of opportunities (training, meetings, networking events, etc.) will pass by your desk. Take advantage of everything you can – you never know who you will meet!

Lesego Kobue

Material manager

Vanderbijlpark, South Africa

Q:
What do you do as a learner technician? Will this lead to being a technician, and if so, when?
A:

As a learner technician I am undergoing training for a year. In the first semester I learnt the theoretical and practical side of the course. Now in the second semester, I, I like all other learner technicians have been designated a plant where we are assisting employees during their work shifts. This enhances the skills you have obtained from the first semester and gives you exposure to the working environment.

After successfully completing a year of training as a learner technician, I will spend 18 months serving as a candidate technician. After this is completed, I will be a full out technician.

Q:
What brought about your interest in the pure mathematics and sciences field?
A:

Mathematics was introduced to me at a very tender age, by my uncle who also works for ArcelorMittal, and I grew to love the subject as time passed. I opted to go through the mathematics and sciences route, at Suncrest High school, because I knew the commitment ArcelorMittal South Africa puts into improving the performance at schools in the communities they operate in and knew this would benefit my education. I also regularly attended the ArcelorMittal science centre from grade 10.

Q:
How did you win the ArcelorMittal scholarship for your studies and would you encourage others to apply?
A:

It was through my attendance at the science centre and the support I was given that I achieved outstanding high school graduation results, which qualified me for the scholarship. With the help of the scholarship, I was able to attend the Vaal University of Technology where I studied technical engineering.

I have spoken so enthusiastically about the scholarship and the science centre so many times to friends and juniors that many applied and are now part of this development scheme.

Q:
How did you find this opportunity to go to university and gain a tertiary qualification in a subject you are passionate about?
A:

It came with its challenges but this opportunity made possible by ArcelorMittal, was great and rewarding. The university experience gave me a sense of independence. Being able to study engineering made me work extra hard to achieve my goal of completing my studies and having a degree.

Q:
How would you describe the culture at ArcelorMittal?
A:

The culture here at ArcelorMittal South Africa is one of friendliness, togetherness and you start thinking of it as a home away from home.

I feel like I never need to ask for help with the employees we have here; help and assistance is always being offered and available.

Samantha Gil Prates

Material manager

ArcelorMittal Kryviy Rih, Ukraine

Q:
Could you briefly describe your role in the procurement team?
A:

My role at ArcelorMittal Kryviy Rih is to create a world-class procurement team, making sure that we deliver goods at the best possible value in terms of cost, quality, service and technology to our internal customers and stakeholders.

Q:
What are the challenging aspects of your job?
A:

I am originally from Brazil, and being an expatriate has its everyday challenges. To be able to understand how cultural differences affect our business is one of the key skills needed in a global company. As a manager in Ukraine, I must be sensitive and understand that people’s behaviour is influenced by their culture, and sometimes I have to manage cross-cultural differences. Another great challenge of managing in Ukraine is to ensure proper people management via effective motivation, providing learning and development opportunities, and regularly reviewing feedback systems.

Q:
What kind of career support have you been given, such as mentoring, training etc.?
A:

For me, the biggest support is being empowered to innovate and to take ownership of projects. Free and open discussions with the local executive board also help my career growth. I also have the opportunity to take part in navigator and mentoring programmes, and I am taking lessons in Russian.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

Geert Hofstede, a social psychologist, once said: “Culture is more often a source of conflict than of synergy. Cultural differences are a nuisance at best and often a disaster." For me, the huge diversity at ArcelorMittal is more a source of creativity and innovation. Culture shock (and its management) is perhaps where ArcelorMittal succeeds while others fail when dealing outside the home country. At the company management level, policies and codes are necessary to ensure a strong foundation.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal that you think would be of interest to other graduates who want to work with the company?
A:

I am very thankful for the opportunity to experience expatriate life, especially in Ukraine, which culturally and environmentally is very different from my country. The challenges have sometimes been surprising – and never regrettable.

Morgan Hewitt

Project representative – learning and development

Chicago, US

Q:
What are your main responsibilities as human resources associate?
A:

As a project representative for learning and development, I am responsible for all associate and staff development programmes. These include on-boarding/orientation, associate continuing education, and I update all departmental staff training programmes. I also maintain databases for staff tracking, attrition and compensation.

Q:
How is working for a steel and mining company adding to your specialist knowledge?
A:

Working at ArcelorMittal has been an opportunity to build on my HR knowledge in many ways. As part of the learning and development team, I have learned a lot about the skills and knowledge essential to the steel industry, from technical to staff areas. Before working here, I knew nothing about how steel is made and my position has given me the chance to learn about steelmaking and the challenges on the shop floor. Further, I have learnt a lot from working as part of a diverse workforce – an opportunity you do not get at every company.

Q:
What are the challenging aspects of your job?
A:

Our company is unique, in that we are very young while also being made up of many predecessor companies – this means there are a lot of challenges from an HR perspective. There are various payroll and tracking systems, benefit plans, policies and procedures, and cultures combined into one. The challenge lies in reviewing existing programmes to develop a single, best system for employees. I have had the opportunity to be involved in projects that address this issue and it is not a simple task. However, successfully completing this kind of work will ultimately benefit everyone.

Q:
What kind of career support have you been given, such as mentoring and training?
A:

ArcelorMittal University has a wide variety of training programmes, from classroom to online training, in leadership, general business and technical skills, and I have taken some courses, including prioritising and delegating, beyond disagreements, understanding steel, facilitator training and handling employee complaints. Although I do not have an official mentor, I have a very supportive work group on whom I can depend for information and guidance.

Q:
Could you briefly describe a project that you found particularly interesting?
A:

After being with ArcelorMittal for only a short time, I was given the task of auditing our performance management process. I carried out the project in two parts. First, we surveyed employees in the US for their experience with the process. Based on survey results, we found some areas of concern so we had to find ways to improve and implement these changes, which we did in the second part of the project.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

ArcelorMittal is a young company, and our culture is still evolving. And as such a big company, each plant and department has a distinct culture that contributes to the overall culture of the company. Within ArcelorMittal, there is a wide range of ages that help to create a unique dynamic.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal that you think would be of interest to other graduates who want to work with the company?
A:

I truly enjoy my work here and the people I work with. There are many opportunities for self-development through courses at ArcelorMittal University and a local option for tuition reimbursement. As ArcelorMittal is the world’s largest steel company, there are numerous career opportunities and I would not say we have typical career paths. I’d also say the learning curve for associates, who are new employees hired from college, is much shorter today than in the past. In other words, I am given more responsibility earlier in my career and I am expected to know more in less time. Due to the size of our company, I have had the opportunity to work with colleagues from across the world. I was always hesitant to work for a large, global company, as I feared I would become “just another employee” without any strong work relationships. However, working at ArcelorMittal has proved to be just the opposite and I am proud to say I am an ArcelorMittal employee.

Johannes Morutoe Mpotu

Sales manager, commodity products – long steel

Vanderbijlpark, South Africa

Q:
What are your main job responsibilities?
A:

I coordinate the sales team. Our work involves development and roll-out of market and product strategy and managing customer relationships.

Q:
In your profession, what learning opportunities can a steel and mining company offer you?
A:

I have gained product and process knowledge, and developed competencies in trading, customer relationships, and strategy development and roll-out.

Q:
What are the most challenging aspects of your job?
A:

It is challenging to achieve, and even exceed, sales targets, budgets and forecasts. It also requires consistent effort to maintain a high level of customer service.

Q:
What kind of career support have you been given?
A:

I have learned from on-the-job training and mentoring. We also have a performance management and reward system that promotes learning. I have also had the opportunity to pursue in-house training at ArcelorMittal University and external training courses.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

ArcelorMittal is driven by performance and results. People are allowed to be creative and innovative, and excellence is rewarded. We also have the opportunity to contribute to projects across the business.

Q:
Could you briefly describe a project that you found particularly interesting?
A:

Product development is always interesting. For example, for one customer we had to improve a normal steel to allow for process improvement efficiencies. Another exciting project involved supporting customers to compete with finished products being imported into the country. We had to develop a competitive strategy not only in terms of prices, but by looking at the total cost of supply. Other projects that push us to be innovative involve business re-engineering or internal rationalisation processes.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal that you think would be of interest to other graduates who want to work with the company?
A:

ArcelorMittal is a global company that can offer diverse opportunities. You can gain both global exposure and experience with a local focus. For example, to develop products for new customers, our steel mills are able to benchmark products and processes around the world by working together with our research and development unit. This way, we do not have to reinvent the wheel if such processes or products have already been made elsewhere within the company.

Matthias Vandamme

Maintenance manager, cold rolling mill

Ghent, Belgium

Q:
Could you briefly describe your job?
A:

I’m working currently as maintenance manager in the cold rolling mill of the Ghent site of Flat Carbon Europe. My job is to organise, together with my team, the maintenance of our industrial equipment, so that all equipment works in a safe and cost-friendly way.

Q:
What is different about being an engineer with a steel and mining company?
A:

I work in a heavy industry environment. In Belgium, there are not many companies like that. Also, the global character of the company gives a lot of opportunities.

Q:
How does working for a steel and mining company add to your technical knowledge?
A:

In my current job, the theories I studied at university come to life. Every day I learn new things. And one thing is for sure: at first sight, practice and theory don’t always seem to work well together.

Q:
What are the challenging aspects of your job?
A:

To coach and motivate my team in the current environment that is rapidly changing. To maintain the high level of performance that we’ve already achieved and to go beyond this.

Q:
What kind of career support have you been given?
A:

I had the opportunity to take a two-year course in industrial management at Ghent University. I have also been trained at ArcelorMittal University, which also offers many online courses. For day-to-day support, I can rely on some mentors with many years of experience.

Q:
How would you describe the work culture and ethics at ArcelorMittal?
A:

There is a high level of employee involvement. There is an open atmosphere where anyone can introduce ideas to optimise existing processes. Respect when dealing with others is key.

Q:
Would you like to share any other aspects of work life or career opportunities at ArcelorMittal that you think would be of interest to other graduates who want to work with the company?
A:

ArcelorMittal’s global presence and the breadth of the business offer an environment to graduates where they can do things hands-on and learn. Given the size of the company, there’s always a new challenge, irrespective of where or what part of the business you work in.