Our steels are used throughout the construction and infrastructure sectors. They create high and low-rise office and residential buildings; they are extensively used in bridges, tunnels, culverts and highways; and they can be found throughout stadiums, airports and railway stations, and in industrial and agricultural buildings. Specialist steels are essential to the building process, too – featuring in heavy construction equipment, hydraulic cylinders, scaffolding and fencing.

Modern construction demands sophisticated materials. In response, our steels offer remarkable versatility. With a growing range of proprietary, trademarked products, we produce the most complete range of grades and specifications of structural steel, façade, ceiling and floor systems, sheet piles solutions for foundations and underground car park systems, steel plumbing solutions and a complete portfolio of reinforcement products. This includes rebar developed specifically for areas with high seismic activity, and steel fibres for tunnelling and other infrastructure projects. These are then supplied to our customers through an international distribution network covering 60 countries.

Our industry-leading, independently peer-reviewed Steligence® concept encourages the separate disciplines within architectural and engineering practices to collaborate and to see buildings as integrated, holistic, and almost ‘living’ entities. This philosophy, combined with the range of products within the Steligence® portfolio, helps to make construction more cost-effective, sustainable and efficient.

ArcelorMittal’s comprehensive database for architects and engineers, Constructalia®, is the most complete construction industry information system on the market. Comprising thousands of cross-referenced product listings, technical specifications and illustrated case studies from around the world, it is acknowledged as an indispensable resource for the architectural and engineering communities.

  • Paris' first steel-framed tower

    At 171 metres tall and with 37 storeys, the 5,000 m² D2 Tower in Paris’s La Défense business district is the French capital’s first steel-framed tower and one of the first steel-framed skyscrapers in France.

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  • Bridges that never need painting

    For large bridges, the story used to be that as soon as repainting had been completed, it was time to start all over again. In the US, bridge owners using our Duracorr® plate, otherwise known as A1010 steel, don’t need to consider painting at all.

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  • The hidden strength of steel fibres

    At first glance, the tunnels of London’s landmark Crossrail project look as if they are made entirely of concrete. Yet hidden within that concrete are 12,504 tonnes of ArcelorMittal steel fibres.

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  • Canada’s busiest bridge

    The two-mile bridge includes a three-corridor design, with two three-lane corridors for vehicular traffic and a two-lane transit corridor capable of accommodating a planned light-rail transit system.

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Innovation: better building

Compared with industries such as automotive and energy, construction has not seen fundamental change over the last 50 years. But today’s technologies and challenges present the industry with exciting opportunities to transform through innovation.

In the construction field, ArcelorMittal’s manufacturing is focused on developing and bringing to market innovative steel products for construction. Our launch in 2018 of the Steligence® concept, a science-based philosophy that offers a holistic, integrated construction solution, brings together the full range of these products, enabling architects and engineers to reconcile the apparently competing demands of creativity, flexibility, sustainability and economics. 

Our industry-leading R&D function continuously develops new products for the industry. These include steels with special properties that enable them to ‘self-heal’ when protective coatings are breached; steel powders and wires developed for use as feedstocks for additive manufacturing (3D printing); and special grades of rebar developed for areas at greater risk of earthquakes.